Suzuki Liana VURV

Suzuki Liana VURV

Suzuki Liana VURV

Suzuki Liana has been around the block for some time now.

Have you noticed that it is not as common as you’d expect a 1.3 Suzuki car to be? I mean, you still see the Baleno plying the roads more often than the Liana. I think it is safe to say that the Suzuki Liana is not exactly a runaway success. The Engine is the same as the Baleno’s (in terms of engine capacity and responsiveness at least), so why aren’t more people buying the Liana? First, of course, is the damn shape. The car seems to be, you know, packed a little too tight from the sides, as if someone squashed it ever-so slightly. And then there is the cost.

Price of Suzuki Liana VURV

The New Suzuki Liana VURV will set you back at least 1,184,500 / -. And that’s just for the Petrol version.

A petrol version?

Yes, it seems that a factory-fitted CNG kit now deserves to be called a “CNG Version”, although it runs just fine on petrol too.

So, Suzuki Liana VURV - petrol version is priced at 1,184,500.

The Suzuki VURV – CNG version is priced at 1,255,500

What about Transmission? Obviously, there is no A/T in this one. Ever. Suzuki and Automatic Transmissions just don’t do well together it seems. When was the last time you saw a Suzuki car with an automatic transmission? Exactly, me neither.

Why You Should Consider Buying The Suzuki Liana

Suzuki is one of my most favorite car companies. Not because they make cheap cars for the ‘rest of us’, and not because their cars usually are the ‘last option’ on anyone’s list of possible cars to buy. No. I like Suzuki cars because of their engines. I don’t know, but a 1.3 Baleno has always, and I mean ALWAYS outperformed a Honda City or even the Toyota Corolla Xli. Always.

And does anyone here remember what the Suzuki Baleno 1.6 used to do to the VTi (Honda) and GLi (Toyota)? Wherever you see the now-rare Baleno 1.6, just offer a small Thanks to Your Lord for showing you such a wonderful car!

So yeah, the Suzuki engines feel more powerful, they drive better and you have a sense of responsiveness that the other two companies just don’t seem to give you. And no one can beat their parts-availability and the Suzuki’s ruggedness.

The only thing BAD in the Suzuki Liana, really, is the shape of the car; I’ve seen better backside of buses! For some people, that is reason enough to not buy the car.

 

Suzuki Liana ke na liana?

liana20main20picLets face it with price of the lowest tier 1.3L RXI MT starting at Rs.0.952million with the top of the line 1.6L EMINENT AT going for Rs.1.086million Liana is ”poor man’s sedan”. But is this just our ATTITUDE?

Although most of us grew up or around Suzuki manufactured vehicles but ever since other Japanese carmakers (Honda, Toyota & Nissan) set-up their car-assembly units we have come to look down upon Suzuki vehicles with a high degree of disdain.

Suzuki has never tried to allay this impression and we have made it out into some sort of a firm belief. Now with new inductions and elimination of ‘failed’ brands Suzuki maybe out to set things right but is it too late, only time will tell.

liana20web20imageLet us examine what it calls Life In A New Age (or LIANA for short). Suzuki’s Liana is the shortest of all sedans with a length of 4.35m from bumper-to-bumper slightly shorter even than Honda’s CITY (4.395m) and comes in three variants: The basic RXI, slightly luxuries LXI & top-of-the-line EMINENT.

Suzuki knowing well their ‘thrift-conscious’ clientele have factory fitted the RXI & LXI with CNG which are available as an option only. With EMINENT SUzuki appears to be attempting to play ‘cach-up’ with the CITY since even their prices have a less than Rs.0.100million difference (some might say its a ‘wannabe’ CITY).

liana20vurv20design20concept201Shiny, metallic interior is complimented by the new chrome front-grill & alloy tyre-rims which are again an option only. With new fog lamps added to suit the needs of up-country Pakistani clients & a new ‘sparkling’ tail-light Liana seems to scream ‘look at me, I am a sedan too’.

The only feature other than the factory-fit 60L CNG cylinder (Petrol tank holds max. 50L fuel) that I really like is the key-less entry buttons (placed on the key itself they may look tachy but are functional to say the least). Here Suzuki has taken a leaf out of the Mitsubishi Lancer’s manual which has the same option in all its new models.

This is all there is to a Liana so now Suzuki Liana ke na Liana “Bring it (home) or don’t” is up to you and your pocket’s liking.